How to determine what you should charge as a personal trainer

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Determining what to charge as a personal trainer can be challenging, especially if you are new to the job market. Keep these points in mind when first starting out

1) Most clubs will set the price for you. That can be a good thing or a bad thing. If the club services all types of people and charges members differently based on the certificates you gain, then they may end up raising your price to a point where no one can afford to work with you. The member is not paying for certificates, they want results. On the other hand, if the club is focused on a specific segment of the population, the club will be able to charge a premium because they know how to service that segment better than the rest. The service is in line with the member’s issue, and the club will have gained proof and experience that can be part of your story. This means pricing will be set higher than normal giving you an advantage you would have trouble getting on your own.

2) Most people make the mistake at pricing themselves a little lower than what the market charges. If the average is $60, they think they should be a little below that number to help sway members your way. We call this the race to the bottom. Who charges the cheapest is not a game I suggest anyone plays.3) Instead, you need to figure out WHO you are serving. Is it hockey players, house wives, students, people with injuries or seniors? The deeper you dive into your category, the more you will start to understand them and you will become a specialist worth charging a premium for.

Once you know who you are helping, you can then determine how much they are willing to pay by seeing what they feel the value is worth. You can find this out by asking people and/or by observing their buying habits.

Personal Training – What You Really Need to Know

Trinity College Sports Centre, Trinity College, Dublin, 10/7/2013 General view of Personal Trainers Mandatory Credit ©INPHO/James Crombie

The fitness industry was worth $21.4 billion in 2011 (1) and is expected to grow by 24 percent from 2010-2020 (2). Buying personal trainers’ services is an emotional decision and one that’s often done without adequate thought. It’s not surprising that some people are taking advantage of consumers. Personal training service is arbitrary. Trainers don’t have a prescribed scope.

Education for for trainers in North America is un-regulated. While good resources exist for trainers, the overall picture is not bright. Anybody can call himself or herself a personal trainer, even without certification. And anybody can create educational platforms and designate trainers as “certified”.

Trainers are also duped into believing that the next best thing is better than the last best thing. The reality is that they get tricked into emptying their wallets just as much as the unfortunate clients they serve.  The trainers are trying to do the right thing. With all the noise, it’s difficult to get a clear and unbiased view of what the job entails and what methods work best.

I was a personal trainer. It was my career and I was passionate about it. My focus is now on giving personal trainers the skills they need to succeed. The prospect that my generation won’t be able to support the raising health care costs for the baby boomers in the near future is scary. Preventative medicine must be a priority. Exercise has been well established to decrease/eliminate risk of cancer, diabetes, heart disease, and even dementia. (3 4 5 6)

Personal training can change people’s lives.  It’s a fulfilling career and not a part-time job.

Click here to read the rest of Jonathan Goodman’s article on personal training

*This article is written by Jonathan Goodman.jon
Jonathan Goodman is the creator of the world’s largest independent collaborative community of personal trainers, the Personal Trainer Development Center (the PTDC). He is also the author of the best book for personal trainersIgnite the Fire. Originally from Toronto, Jon spends his winters exploring the world.

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Do You Have to be Ripped to be a Personal Trainer?

Workout

I used to work with a fat trainer.

He wasn’t a little chunky like he enjoyed a beer or 7 on the weekend — this dude had a belly on him. He was bald with a pudgy face. Every time that he spotted a client on the bench press, he had to contort his body into an awkward anterior pelvic tilt so his belly wouldn’t get in the way.

I worked with this individual early on in my career. Admittedly, I was immature and negative in my thinking. I couldn’t understand why anybody in their right mind would want to train with this guy — he wasn’t particularly attractive and in no way exuded a healthy lifestyle.

Click to read more about the trainer’s responsibility

*This article is written by Jonathan Goodman.
jonJonathan Goodman is the creator of the world’s largest independent collaborative community of personal trainers, the Personal Trainer Development Center (the PTDC). He is also the author of the best book for personal trainersIgnite the Fire. Originally from Toronto, Jon spends his winters exploring the world.
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