My Take on Carbohydrate Intake

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Carbs, carbs, carbs
Fats used to be evil, now they have been justly rehabilitated.

In the U.S., polarization is the norm. Carbs are no exception. Some people claim that the quality does not matter as long as you watch your calories. In other words, a blender drink of Coca Cola, leftover pizza and a few Cadbury’s Turkish Delight is fine, as long as it fits your macros. On the other pole, carbs that were not around in the paleolithic era are downright evil. Those are obviously very different opinions, here is my take on carbs

1.) You need to deserve your carbs. How many grams of carbs you can afford will be determined by levels of muscle mass, volume and intensity of training, percentage of body fat and insulin sensitivity. Some people obviously need to restrict their carbs to 10 licks of a dried prune every six months, while some can indulge in using 1,000 to 1,500 grams.

2.) Some people can get away with grains, some should stay away from them. A high quality food intolerance panel will help determine that. The BEST ONE AND THE ONLY ONE WORTH DOING being the ones offered by Cyrex labs.

Click here to get your entire carb intake tip list!

*This article is written by Charles R. Poliquin
Charles R Poliquin is recognized as one of the World’s most accomplished strength coaches who attributes his success to the quest for the “magical training program”. Now as Strength Sensei he shares his acquired knowledge and wisdom with the emerging leaders in the strength and conditioning field. Now after decades of disciplined research and training he has refined his craft so he can educate the dedicated few who want to maximize their learning so they can bring their results back to their athletes. Charles now dedicates his time to educate strength coaches from around the world so they can produce world class athletes.

 

10 Things to Consider When Choosing To Hire The Best Personal Trainer For You

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Buying personal trainers’ services is an emotional decision and one that often lacks adequate thought.

The industry is unregulated and service is arbitrary.

Trainers don’t have a prescribed scope. There are very good trainers and very bad trainers. What you may not know is that anybody can create educational platforms and designate trainers as “certified” but, as you’ll soon see, certification ≠ qualification.

When you decide to invest in a trainer you’re making a decision that has the potential to change your life. Yet, most who hire trainers put little-to-no thought into it. Would you walk into a car dealership on a whim and buy a car? Likely not, you’d do your research and make an informed decision.

This article will give you all of the tools you need to help you make the most informed decision possible.  Here’s how to decide what personal trainer is best for you.

*This article is written by Jonathan Goodman.jon
Jonathan Goodman is the creator of the world’s largest independent collaborative community of personal trainers, the Personal Trainer Development Center (the PTDC). He is also the author of the best book for personal trainersIgnite the Fire. Originally from Toronto, Jon spends his winters exploring the world.

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4 Tips to Feel Great With Strength Training

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If your strength training workouts don’t make you feel great or, worse, leave you feeling achy or beat up, then you need to change things. Now. Here’s how.

Below you’ll find four tips I use with clients (and myself) who complained that lifting weights didn’t “feel good” or left them feeling achy. Whether you’re an older lifter and want to strength train as safely as possible, you have previous aches and pains you want to alleviate, or you want your workouts to make you feel better and have more energy, give these four tips a try during your next workout.

Tip 1: Slow down your reps.*

This tip is simple to practice but also very effective, especially if you’ve previously experienced discomfort or pain from strength training workouts. Give this a try during your next workout (or even test it now with a set of push-ups) to experience it for yourself.

Slow down your reps by taking approximately 2-3 seconds to perform the lowering portion of the exercise. You don’t need to count, but noticeably slow down your rep performance. Using a push-up as an example, take 2-3 seconds to lower yourself down to the ground.

Then smoothly reverse the motion; do not use momentum or “bounce” back up. Sticking with the push-up example, after you lower yourself down, smoothly reverse the motion and press back up. It may help to add a slight pause in the bottom position to ensure you don’t bounce out of the bottom.

Click here to read the rest of Nia’s tips with videos.

**This article was written by Nia Shanks, and is published on her blog “Lift Like a Girl.” Nia Shanks is a writer and coach, and leader of the Lift Like a Girl revolution. She helps women discover and reach their potential through an empowering approach to health, fitness, and life. niashanks.com

Concepts for the Refueling Day

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Enjoying a hard-earned cheat meal, a.k.a refuel meal, is always good on the physique, and the mind too. But using cheat meals the right way can make or break your physique.

Strangely enough, with the growing numbers of orthorexics (aka “diet Nazis”) in the field of health and fitness, some might not be cheating often enough, or eating too little extra calories to make a difference in their metabolic rate. Of course, at the other end of the spectrum we have those who think it’s perfectly normal to have a large pizza and a dozen donuts because they’re exhausted after walking an extra block with their dog.

This is why most diets or physique transformation boot camps last for 12-weeks, by the way. It’s sufficient time to see results and take pictures, while the client can maintain discipline. But after this, most return to their usual habits and binge as a way to compensate for eating boiled chicken and broccoli for 3 months, often gaining back the fat they lost with a little extra. This is why I’m against coaches who never allow their clients to deviate from their diets. Not only does it stress the client out, but a well-placed cheat will in fact help their physique composition goal. It’s my experience that most client will lose fat faster, and stick to their meal plan longer, if they are allowed to have a cheat meal every 4 to 6 days. But it has to be a cheat meal, not a cheat day.

Click here to find out how I have my clients cheat to optimize their fat loss

*This article is written by Charles R. Poliquin
Charles R Poliquin is recognized as one of the World’s most accomplished strength coaches who attributes his success to the quest for the “magical training program”. Now as Strength Sensei he shares his acquired knowledge and wisdom with the emerging leaders in the strength and conditioning field. Now after decades of disciplined research and training he has refined his craft so he can educate the dedicated few who want to maximize their learning so they can bring their results back to their athletes. Charles now dedicates his time to educate strength coaches from around the world so they can produce world class athletes.

Working Out Shouldn’t Hurt & Your Diet Shouldn’t be Miserable

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How you eat and move your body should make you feel good about yourself and make your life better. Fitness should not cause pain, and your diet shouldn’t rule your life.

Seriously, what the hell is going on?

It seems like more than ever I hear people talk about how “brutally sore they are” and how “everything hurts.”

Despite causing pain, people continue to perform workouts that hurt. Hell, some people are treating pain like it’s a badge of honor (It almost killed me and it hurts to walk, but I did it!).

I can’t believe this actually needs to be said: your workouts should not hurt. They should not cause you pain. If you’re constantly in pain from your workouts, something is wrong and needs to be addressed immediately.

I’ve had this same conversation with several men over the years (especially when I worked in a commercial gym).

“Damn my shoulder is killing me. Every time I bench press it gets worse. Any ideas what I should do?”

“Since you asked: first, you need to stop performing the barbell bench press. Second –.”

“No.”

“Excuse me?”

“No. I’m not going to stop benching.”

“Well then. There’s nothing else I can really say, other than to enjoy your future rotator cuff surgery.”

In this example, the problem is somewhat easy to solve. Replace an exercise that causes pain (bench press) with a similar movement that can be done pain-free (for many, in this example, that would be a dumbbell bench press variation or even a barbell bench press at a low incline). Combine that exercise swap with an increase in upper back work (e.g., face pulls, rows, band pull-aparts, etc) and those sore shoulders may start to feel a lot better; I’ve seen it work numerous times.

Click here to read the rest of Nia’s article.

**This article was written by Nia Shanks, and is published on her blog “Lift Like a Girl.” Nia Shanks is a writer and coach, and leader of the Lift Like a Girl revolution. She helps women discover and reach their potential through an empowering approach to health, fitness, and life. niashanks.com