Three ways to gain clients

Prime adult Caucasian female with personal trainer at gym.

If you’re just starting out in the field of personal training, the chances of having a long list of waiting clients right away is slim. Here are a few simple ways to help gain your first few clients.

1.) Family and friends are your greatest allies.
Focus on helping people in your current network. If you’re just starting out, your goal should be to master your craft by helping a lot of people. FREE removes the barrier of entry and spreads word fast. It’s common in the coaching world to say, “Don’t undervalue yourself.” But this is bad advice for someone just starting out. Be generous and help people out like your friends and family.

2) Your story is important.
Tell people your story. Why did you get into fitness and personal training in the first place? What are you hoping to see? Ask these people if they can be your first client. If your story is authentic, it’s sure to connect with someone AND motivate them at the same time to better themselves.

3) Don’t be afraid to ask.
Once you have a small group of people and they are seeing value, give them a reason to bring a friend. This time, charge them a small fee. As the network expands, your price will also increase.

A task like this can be daunting, but it can also be extremely rewarding. Especially when you’re able to watch your clientele list flourish before your eyes.

Remember, your authenticity is extremely important. This is especially true for people who need help with their health and fitness. If you keep these tips in mind, you’ll be able to watch your client list grow in no time, and in turn, you’ll be helping more people reach their goals.

Personal Training – What You Really Need to Know

Trinity College Sports Centre, Trinity College, Dublin, 10/7/2013 General view of Personal Trainers Mandatory Credit ©INPHO/James Crombie

The fitness industry was worth $21.4 billion in 2011 (1) and is expected to grow by 24 percent from 2010-2020 (2). Buying personal trainers’ services is an emotional decision and one that’s often done without adequate thought. It’s not surprising that some people are taking advantage of consumers. Personal training service is arbitrary. Trainers don’t have a prescribed scope.

Education for for trainers in North America is un-regulated. While good resources exist for trainers, the overall picture is not bright. Anybody can call himself or herself a personal trainer, even without certification. And anybody can create educational platforms and designate trainers as “certified”.

Trainers are also duped into believing that the next best thing is better than the last best thing. The reality is that they get tricked into emptying their wallets just as much as the unfortunate clients they serve.  The trainers are trying to do the right thing. With all the noise, it’s difficult to get a clear and unbiased view of what the job entails and what methods work best.

I was a personal trainer. It was my career and I was passionate about it. My focus is now on giving personal trainers the skills they need to succeed. The prospect that my generation won’t be able to support the raising health care costs for the baby boomers in the near future is scary. Preventative medicine must be a priority. Exercise has been well established to decrease/eliminate risk of cancer, diabetes, heart disease, and even dementia. (3 4 5 6)

Personal training can change people’s lives.  It’s a fulfilling career and not a part-time job.

Click here to read the rest of Jonathan Goodman’s article on personal training

*This article is written by Jonathan Goodman.jon
Jonathan Goodman is the creator of the world’s largest independent collaborative community of personal trainers, the Personal Trainer Development Center (the PTDC). He is also the author of the best book for personal trainersIgnite the Fire. Originally from Toronto, Jon spends his winters exploring the world.

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My Take on Carbohydrate Intake

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Carbs, carbs, carbs
Fats used to be evil, now they have been justly rehabilitated.

In the U.S., polarization is the norm. Carbs are no exception. Some people claim that the quality does not matter as long as you watch your calories. In other words, a blender drink of Coca Cola, leftover pizza and a few Cadbury’s Turkish Delight is fine, as long as it fits your macros. On the other pole, carbs that were not around in the paleolithic era are downright evil. Those are obviously very different opinions, here is my take on carbs

1.) You need to deserve your carbs. How many grams of carbs you can afford will be determined by levels of muscle mass, volume and intensity of training, percentage of body fat and insulin sensitivity. Some people obviously need to restrict their carbs to 10 licks of a dried prune every six months, while some can indulge in using 1,000 to 1,500 grams.

2.) Some people can get away with grains, some should stay away from them. A high quality food intolerance panel will help determine that. The BEST ONE AND THE ONLY ONE WORTH DOING being the ones offered by Cyrex labs.

Click here to get your entire carb intake tip list!

*This article is written by Charles R. Poliquin
Charles R Poliquin is recognized as one of the World’s most accomplished strength coaches who attributes his success to the quest for the “magical training program”. Now as Strength Sensei he shares his acquired knowledge and wisdom with the emerging leaders in the strength and conditioning field. Now after decades of disciplined research and training he has refined his craft so he can educate the dedicated few who want to maximize their learning so they can bring their results back to their athletes. Charles now dedicates his time to educate strength coaches from around the world so they can produce world class athletes.

 

10 Things to Consider When Choosing To Hire The Best Personal Trainer For You

Personal trainer helping woman at gym

Buying personal trainers’ services is an emotional decision and one that often lacks adequate thought.

The industry is unregulated and service is arbitrary.

Trainers don’t have a prescribed scope. There are very good trainers and very bad trainers. What you may not know is that anybody can create educational platforms and designate trainers as “certified” but, as you’ll soon see, certification ≠ qualification.

When you decide to invest in a trainer you’re making a decision that has the potential to change your life. Yet, most who hire trainers put little-to-no thought into it. Would you walk into a car dealership on a whim and buy a car? Likely not, you’d do your research and make an informed decision.

This article will give you all of the tools you need to help you make the most informed decision possible.  Here’s how to decide what personal trainer is best for you.

*This article is written by Jonathan Goodman.jon
Jonathan Goodman is the creator of the world’s largest independent collaborative community of personal trainers, the Personal Trainer Development Center (the PTDC). He is also the author of the best book for personal trainersIgnite the Fire. Originally from Toronto, Jon spends his winters exploring the world.

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4 Tips to Feel Great With Strength Training

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If your strength training workouts don’t make you feel great or, worse, leave you feeling achy or beat up, then you need to change things. Now. Here’s how.

Below you’ll find four tips I use with clients (and myself) who complained that lifting weights didn’t “feel good” or left them feeling achy. Whether you’re an older lifter and want to strength train as safely as possible, you have previous aches and pains you want to alleviate, or you want your workouts to make you feel better and have more energy, give these four tips a try during your next workout.

Tip 1: Slow down your reps.*

This tip is simple to practice but also very effective, especially if you’ve previously experienced discomfort or pain from strength training workouts. Give this a try during your next workout (or even test it now with a set of push-ups) to experience it for yourself.

Slow down your reps by taking approximately 2-3 seconds to perform the lowering portion of the exercise. You don’t need to count, but noticeably slow down your rep performance. Using a push-up as an example, take 2-3 seconds to lower yourself down to the ground.

Then smoothly reverse the motion; do not use momentum or “bounce” back up. Sticking with the push-up example, after you lower yourself down, smoothly reverse the motion and press back up. It may help to add a slight pause in the bottom position to ensure you don’t bounce out of the bottom.

Click here to read the rest of Nia’s tips with videos.

**This article was written by Nia Shanks, and is published on her blog “Lift Like a Girl.” Nia Shanks is a writer and coach, and leader of the Lift Like a Girl revolution. She helps women discover and reach their potential through an empowering approach to health, fitness, and life. niashanks.com